Inyo County Free Library - New Acquisitions

These are books and media new to the library and cataloged by the Inyo County Free Library.

Additional information about each title can be found in the catalog (click on the title). For older acquisition lists choose from Select another list. To request any of these titles please contact your local library branch.

1 to 5 of 5

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Fate, time, and language: an essay on free will : David Foster Wallace

Publishing Date: c2011

Classification: 100

Call Number: 123

In 1962, the philosopher Richard Taylor used six commonly accepted presuppositions to imply that human beings have no control over the future. David Foster Wallace not only took issue with Taylor's method, which, according to him, scrambled the relations of logic, language, and the physical world, but also noted a semantic trick at the heart of Taylor's argument. Fate, Time, and Language presents Wallace's brilliant critique of Taylor's work. Written long before the publication of his fiction and essays, Wallace's thesis reveals his great skepticism of abstract thinking made to function as a negation of something more genuine and real. He was especially suspicious of certain paradigms of thought-the cerebral aestheticism of modernism, the clever gimmickry of postmodernism-that abandoned "the very old traditional human verities that have to do with spirituality and emotion and community." As Wallace rises to meet the challenge to free will presented by Taylor, we witness the developing perspective of this major novelist, along with his struggle to establish solid logical ground for his convictions. This volume, edited by Steven M. Cahn and Maureen Eckert, reproduces Taylor's original article and other works on fatalism cited by Wallace. James Ryerson's introduction connects Wallace's early philosophical work to the themes and explorations of his later fiction, and Jay Garfield supplies a critical biographical epilogue. - (Columbia Univ Pr)

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The afterlife of Billy Fingers: how my bad-boy brother proved to me there's life after death

By Kagan, Annie

Publishing Date: [2013]

Classification: 100

Call Number: 133.9 KAG

Billy's ongoing after-death communications take his sister on an unprecedented journey into the bliss and wonder of life beyond death --

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Life unlocked: 7 revolutionary lessons to overcome fear

By Pillay, Srinivasan S.

Publishing Date: c2010

Classification: 100

Call Number: 152.46 PIL

A psychologist reveals the way hidden anxieties trigger self-sabotaging behaviors, sharing exercises based on cutting-edge neuroscience to explain how to reframe and move past fear in order to pursue one's goals.

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The folly of fools: the logic of deceit and self-deception in human life

By Trivers, Robert

Publishing Date: c2011

Classification: 100

Call Number: 153.4 TRI

"The time is ripe," Trivers says in the preface, "for a general theory of deceit and self-deception based on evolutionary biology." Self-deception, he suggests, is a function of evolution. We evolved the ability to deceive ourselves, to deliberately distort the evidence of our own senses, so that we can deceive others. (Our brains can more easily participate in deception if, first, they are unaware of the contradiction, and have been themselves deceived.) Trivers, a professor of anthropology and biological sciences, organizes the book in sections on, for instance, self-deception in everyday life, self-deception and the structure of knowledge in the social sciences, and religion and self-deception. Self-deception can take many forms, from little white lies to outright fraud to large-scale, deliberate rewriting of the facts (Holocaust denial is one good example), and Trivers does an excellent job of showing how the human species could not have evolved to its present state without a keen ability to ignore, edit, or distort the information from its own senses. Approaching self-deception from a Darwinian angle is not only fresh and thought-provoking, it also feels right and appropriate. A must-read for students of psychology, sociology, and evolutionary theory. Copyright 2011 Booklist Reviews.

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A world without why

By Geuss, Raymond

Publishing Date: [2014]

Classification: 100

Call Number: 190 GEU

"The essays in this collection--several of which are published here for the first time--explore the genesis and historical development of this optimistic configuration in ethical thought and the ways in which it has shown itself to be unfounded and misguided. Discussions of Greco-Roman antiquity and of the philosophies of Socrates, Plato, Hegel, Marx, Nietzsche, and Adorno play a central role in many of these essays. Geuss also ranges over such topics as the concepts of intelligibility, authority, democracy, and criticism; the role of lying in politics; architecture; the place of theology in ethics; tragedy and comedy; and the struggle between realism and our search for meaning. Characterized by Geuss's wide-ranging interests in literature, philosophy, and history, and by his political commitment and trenchant style, A World without Why raises fundamental questions about the viability not just of specific ethical concepts and theses, but of our most basic assumptions about what ethics could and must be."--www.Amazon.com.

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