Inyo County Free Library - New Acquisitions

These are books and media new to the library and cataloged by the Inyo County Free Library.

Additional information about each title can be found in the catalog (click on the title). For older acquisition lists choose from Select another list. To request any of these titles please contact your local library branch.

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Reimagining historic house museums: new approaches and proven solutions

Publishing Date: [2019]

Classification: 900

Call Number: 907.4

Drawing from innovative organizations across the United States, Reimagining Historic House Museums is an indispensable source of field-tested tools and techniques drawn from such wide-ranging sources as non-profit management, business strategy, and software development. It also profiles historic sites that are using new models to engage with their communities to become more relevant, are adopting creative forms of interpretation and programming, and earning income to become more financially sustainable. The book is a combination of a museum conference, a hands-on workshop, and toolbox. It contains five main parts: Fundamentals and Essentials, Audiences, Different Approaches to Familiar Topics, Methods, Imagining New Kinds of House Museums. This authoritative guide from the American Association for State and Local History (AASLH) will help house museum boards, directors, and staff seeking a path forward in rapidly changing times. Graduate programs in public history, museum studies, curatorial studies, and historic preservation will discover models and approaches that will provoke lively discussions about the issues facing the field.--

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The hard way around: the passages of Joshua Slocum

By Wolff, Geoffrey

Publishing Date: 2010

Classification: 900

Call Number: 910.4 WOL

A portrait of the legendary sea commander traces his rapid rise from an uneducated childhood in mid-nineteenth-century Nova Scotia to the leader of ships that experienced high-danger adventures, including the first documented solo journey around the world.

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On Celtic tides: one man's journey around Ireland by sea kayak

By Duff, Chris

Publishing Date: 2000, ©1999

Classification: 900

Call Number: 914.1504 DUF

A sea kayak battles the freezing Irish waters as the morning sun rises out of the countryside. On the western horizon is the pinnacle of Skellig Michael-700 feet of vertical rock rising out of exploding seas. Somewhere on the isolated island are sixth-century monastic ruins where the light of civilization was kept burning during the Dark Ages by early Christian Irish monks. Puffins surface a few yards from the boat, as hundreds of gannets wheel overhead on six foot wing spans. The ocean rises violently and tosses paddler and boat as if they were discarded flotsam. This is just one day of Chris Duff's incredible three month journey. - (McMillan Palgrave)

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The little book of tourists in Iceland: tips, tricks, and what the Icelanders really think of you

By Alda Sigmundsdodttir

Publishing Date: 2017

Classification: 900

Call Number: 914.912 ALD

This book provides a unique insight into the social and environmental impact that tourism is having on Iceland, and with wit and intelligence offers invaluable tips for touring safely, responsibly, and in harmony with the locals. A fascinating resource for anyone interested in contemporary Iceland, and an essential companion for all visitors to the country. Among the topics addressed in this book: ´Ø Why now? - Reasons for the tourism boom in Iceland ´Ø The impact of tourism on Iceland´s housing market, health care system, law enforcement, search and rescue operations, and more ´Ø Klondike fever in the Icelandic tourism industry ´Ø Touring Iceland and staying safe: the main dangers of travel in Iceland ´Ø Out driving: essential things to keep in mind on Iceland´s roads ´Ø What they think of us: complaints that tourists of different nationalities have about Iceland and Icelanders ´Ø What we think of them: tourist behaviours that really, seriously irk the Icelanders ´Ø Crazy stories of tourists in Iceland ´Ø The environmental footprint: depletion of natural resources, pollution, and the physical impact of tourism ´Ø Taxing tourists, or not - all about the endless debate ´Ø How the locals really feel about the tourist invasion ´Ø The truth about those Iceland myths: jailed bankers, refusal to bail out banks, believing in elves, incest app, promiscuity, disgusting food ´<?char 140 ?> ´<?char 140 ?> and much, much more.

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Names for the sea: strangers in Iceland

By Moss, Sarah

Publishing Date: 2013

Classification: 900

Call Number: 914.912 MOS

Novelist Sarah Moss had a childhood dream of moving to Iceland, sustained by a wild summer there when she was nineteen. In 2009, she saw an advertisement for a job at the University of Iceland and applied on a whim, despite having two young children and a comfortable life in an English cathedral city. The resulting adventure was shaped by Iceland's economic collapse, which halved the value of her salary, by the eruption of Eyjafjallajokull and by a collection of new friends, including a poet who saw the only bombs fall on Iceland in 1943, a woman who speaks to elves and a chef who guided Sarah's family around the intricacies of Icelandic cuisine. Sarah was drawn to the strangeness of Icelandic landscape, and explored hillsides of boiling mud, volcanic craters and fissures, and the unsurfaced roads that link remote farms and fishing villages in the far north. She walked the coast path every night after her children were in bed, watching the northern lights and the comings and goings of migratory birds. As the weeks and months went by, the children settled in local schools and Sarah got to know her students and colleagues, she and her family learned new ways to live.

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The urban circus: travels with Mexico's malabaristas

By Rainsford, Catriona

Publishing Date: 2013

Classification: 900

Call Number: 917.2048 RAI

The story opens in North Mexico, with a chance meeting with a group of Mexican street performers. Entranced by their stories and lifestyle, Catriona Rainsford decides to go with them on what becomes a two-year, hand-to-mouth journey across Mexico, learning to live off nothing more than performance skills and the kindness of strangers.

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Hiking and exploring the Paria River: including : the story of John D. Lee, Lee's Ferry, the Mormon Wagon Road to Arizona, and the Mountain Meadows Massacre

By Kelsey, Michael R.

Publishing Date: 2017

Classification: 900

Call Number: 917.9133 KEL

Introducing the enlarged & updated 6th Edition of the book, Hiking and Exploring the Paria River. This edition includes 64 more pages of new hiking areas, fotographic tours, and local history. The new page count is 448. Focusing on the Paria River drainage, this guidebook covers the entrenched canyons from Bryce Canyon south to the Vermillion Cliffs and Lee s Ferry. Among the 56 maps, you ll find new information on the Between the Creeks Slots, Hackberry Canyon, Buckskin Gulch, a new route into the middle of the Lower Paria River Gorge, Coyote Buttes, The Wave, the Sand Hills, and White Pockets. In preparation for this new edition, the author interviewed a number of local old timers to expand on the guidebook s already rich regional history. Also added to this 6th Edition, is an enlarged section on John D. Lee along with new information about the Mountain Meadows Massacre and why Lee was sent to the Colorado River to establish a ferry. The reason was, Brigham Young and the Church leadership wanted to create a Mormon Wagon Road into Arizona to establish a mission to the Indians, colonize new lands before the gentiles got it, plus create a corridor to Mexico in case the Mormons were run out again. Adding the Mormon Wagon Road to Arizona is stretching the boundaries of the Paria River, but it seems necessary so that readers can better understand local Southern Utah politics and history. A new segment with 18 pages covers the route, the waterholes and the first 4 settlements created by the Mormons in the late 1870 s along the Little Colorado River. - (Brigham Distributing)

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Alexander the Great

By Freeman, Philip

Publishing Date: 2011

Classification: 900

Call Number: 938 FRE

In the first authoritative biography of Alexander the Great written for a general audience in a generation, classicist and historian Philip Freeman tells the remarkable life of the great conqueror. The celebrated Macedonian king has been one of the most enduring figures in history. He was a general of such skill and renown that for two thousand years other great leaders studied his strategy and tactics, from Hannibal to Napoleon, with countless more in between. He flashed across the sky of history like a comet, glowing brightly and burning out quickly: crowned at age nineteen, dead by thirty-two. He established the greatest empire of the ancient world; Greek coins and statues are found as far east as Afghanistan. Our interest in him has never faded. Alexander was born into the royal family of Macedonia, the kingdom that would soon rule over Greece. Tutored as a boy by Aristotle, Alexander had an inquisitive mind that would serve him well when he faced formidable obstacles during his military campaigns. Shortly after taking command of the army, he launched an invasion of the Persian empire, and continued his conquests as far south as the deserts of Egypt and as far east as the mountains of present-day Pakistan and the plains of India. Alexander spent nearly all his adult life away from his homeland, and he and his men helped spread the Greek language throughout western Asia, where it would become the lingua franca of the ancient world. Within a short time after Alexander's death in Baghdad, his empire began to fracture. Best known among his successors are the Ptolemies of Egypt, whose empire lasted until Cleopatra. In his lively and authoritative biography of Alexander, classical scholar and historian Philip Freeman describes Alexander's astonishing achievements and provides insight into the mercurial character of the great conqueror. Alexander could be petty and magnanimous, cruel and merciful, impulsive and farsighted. Above all, he was ferociously, intensely competitive and could not tolerate losing--which he rarely did. As Freeman explains, without Alexander, the influence of Greece on the ancient world would surely not have been as great as it was, even if his motivation was not to spread Greek culture for beneficial purposes but instead to unify his empire. Only a handful of people have influenced history as Alexander did, which is why he continues to fascinate us. - Publisher.

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Ambassador Morgenthau's story: a personal account of the Armenian Genocide

By Morgenthau, Henry

Publishing Date: 2008, ©1918

Classification: 900

Call Number: 940.31 MOR

A German superman at Constantinople -- The "boss system" in the Ottoman Empire and how it proved useful to Germany -- "The personal representative of the Kaiser" : Wangenheim opposes the sale of American warships to Greece -- Germany mobilizes the Turkish army -- Wangenheim smuggles the Goeben and the Breslau through the Dardanelles -- Wangenheim tells the American ambassador how the Kaiser started the war -- Germany's plans for new territories, coaling stations, and indemnities -- A classic instance of German propaganda -- Germany closes the Dardanelles and so separates Russia from her Allies -- Turkey's abrogation of the capitulations : Enver living in a palace, with plenty of money and an imperial bride -- Germany forces Turkey into the war -- The Turks attempt to treat alien enemies decently, but the Germans insist on persecuting them -- The invasion of the Notre Dame de Sion school -- Wangenheim and the Bethlehem steel company : a "holy war" that was made in Germany -- Djemal, a troublesome Mark Antony : the first German attempt to get a German peace -- The Turks prepare to flee from Constantinople and establish a new capital in Asia minor : the allied fleet bombarding the Dardanelles -- Enver as the man who demonstrated "the vulnerability of the British fleet" : old-fashioned defenses of the Dardanelles -- The allied armada sails away, though on the brink of victory -- A fight for three thousand civilians -- More adventures of the foreign residents -- Bulgaria on the auction block -- The Turk reverts to the ancestral type -- The "revolution" at Van -- The murder of a nation -- Talaat tells why he deports the Armenians -- Enver Pasha discusses the Armenians -- "I shall do nothing for the Armenians," says the German ambassador -- Enver again moves for peace : farewell to the sultan and to Turkey -- Von Jagow, Zimmerman, and German-Americans.

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Survival in Auschwitz: the Nazi assault on humanity

By Levi, Primo

Publishing Date: 1996

Classification: 900

Call Number: 940.5318 LEV

In 1943, Primo Levi, a 25-year-old chemist and "Italian citizen of Jewish race," was arrested by Italian fascists and deported from his native Turin to Auschwitz. This is Levi's classic account of his ten months in the German death camp, a harrowing story of systematic cruelty and miraculous endurance. Remarkable for its simplicity, restraint, compassion, and even wit, Survival in Auschwitz remains a lasting testament to the indestructibility of the human spirit. Included in this new edition is an illuminating conversation between Philip Roth and Primo Levi never before published in book form.--From publisher description.

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Wannsee: the road to the final solution

By Longerich, Peter

Publishing Date: 2021

Classification: 900

Call Number: 940.5318 LON

"On 20 January 1942, fifteen high-ranking Nazi Party, government, and SS officials arrived for a meeting in a luxurious villa on the shores of the Wannsee, a lake on the western outskirts of Berlin. The elegance and grandeur of the villa, with its exquisite lakeside position and opulent interiors, stood in stark contrast, however, to the purpose of that meeting: to discuss the implementation of the 'final solution to the Jewish question'." -- inside front book jacket flap.

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Hitler's American gamble: Pearl Harbor and Germany's march to global war

By Simms, Brendan

Publishing Date: 2021

Classification: 900

Call Number: 940.5343 SIM

"By early December 1941, war and genocide had changed Europe beyond recognition. Nazi Germany had occupied most of the continent and opened concentration camps, while millions of soldiers had died on the front. In Asia, the outbreak of the Second Sino-Japanese War had turned mainland China into a battleground and the Pacific Islands into an armed camp. Still, these far-off conflicts were not yet inextricably linked, and the greatest power the world had yet seen, the United States, was at peace. Hitler's American Gamble explores the five critical days that changed everything: December 7th-11th, from Japan's attack on Pearl Harbor to Hitler's declaration of war on the United States. Historians have conventionally believed that Japan's pre-emptive strike led inexorably to the German-U.S. war and the outbreak of a truly global conflict. Tracing diplomatic and strategic developments in real time, historians Brendan Simms and Charlie Laderman reveal how in fact an American declaration of war against Germany was far from inevitable. Roosevelt faced a Congress and country unwilling to break with the isolationism it had embraced at the end of World War I. The outbreak of an expensive Pacific war with Japan on December 7th failed to convince many Americans that the nation should also intervene in Europe, despite the fervent hopes of Allied leaders and the Roosevelt administration. Only with Hitler's intervention on December 11th was the United States irrevocably roped into war with Germany. This was not the foolhardy decision of a man so bloodthirsty he forgot all sense of strategy, but a decision Hitler took rationally and a gamble that made sense for Germany, even as it expanded its theatre of war. Backed by deep archival research, Hitler's American Gamble revises our understanding of World War II, uncovering the rationale behind Hitler's greatest strategic error and offering a new perspective on America's rise to global power"--

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Stalin's war: a new history of World War II

By McMeekin, Sean

Publishing Date: 2021

Classification: 900

Call Number: 940.5347 MCM

"Drawing on ambitious new research in European and U.S. archives, Stalin's War revolutionizes our understanding of World War II by moving its epicenter to the east. Hitler's genocidal ambition may have helped unleash Armageddon, but as McMeekin shows, the war that emerged in Europe in August 1939 was the one Stalin wanted, not Hitler. So, too, was the Pacific war of 1941-1945 the direct result of Stalin's maneuverings, which he orchestrated to unleash the furies of war between capitalist powers Japan and the U.S. This groundbreaking reassessment of the Second World War elucidates Stalin's conquest of most of Eurasia, from Berlin to Beijing, for Communism"--

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Ritchie Boy Secrets: How a Force of Immigrants and Refugees Helped Win World War II

By Eddy, Beverley D

Publishing Date: [2021]

Classification: 900

Call Number: 940.54 EDD

"This is the story of the 15,000 immigrants and refugees who used their native language skills and knowledge of their home countries to help America to victory in World War II. Beverley Driver Eddy tells their story thoroughly and colorfully, drawing heavily on interviews with surviving Ritchie Boys"--

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Rebellion: the history of England from James I to the Glorious Revolution

By Ackroyd, Peter

Publishing Date: 2014

Classification: 900

Call Number: 941.06 ACK

Peter Ackroyd has been praised as one of the greatest living chroniclers of Britain and its people. In Rebellion, he continues his dazzling account of the history of England, beginning with the progress south of the Scottish king, James VI, who on the death of Elizabeth I became the first Stuart king of England, and ending with the deposition and flight into exile of his grandson, James II. The Stuart monarchy brought together the two nations of England and Scotland into one realm, albeit a realm still marked by political divisions that echo to this day. More importantly, perhaps, the Stuart era was marked by the cruel depredations of civil war, and the killing of a king. Shrewd and opinionated, James I was eloquent on matters as diverse as theology, witchcraft, and the abuses of tobacco, but his attitude to the English parliament sowed the seeds of the division that would split the country during the reign of his hapless heir, Charles I. Ackroyd offers a brilliant, warts-and-all portrayal of Charles's nemesis, Oliver Cromwell, Parliament's great military leader and England's only dictator, who began his career as a political liberator but ended it as much of a despot as "that man of blood," the king he executed. England's turbulent seventeenth century is vividly laid out before us, but so too is the cultural and social life of the period, notable for its extraordinarily rich literature, including Shakespeare's late masterpieces, Jacobean tragedy, the poetry of John Donne and Milton and Thomas Hobbes's great philosophical treatise, Leviathan. In addition to its account of England's royalty, Rebellion also gives us a very real sense of the lives of ordinary English men and women, lived out against a backdrop of constant disruption and uncertainty. - (McMillan Palgrave)

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Charles I's killers in America: the lives & afterlives of Edward Whalley & William Goffe

By Jenkinson, Matthew

Publishing Date: 2019

Classification: 900

Call Number: 941.0620 JEN

When the British monarchy was restored in 1660, King Charles II was faced with the conundrum of what to do with those who had been involved in the execution of his father eleven years earlier. Facing a grisly fate at the gallows, some of the men who had signed Charles I's death warrant fled to America. 'Charles I's Killers in America' traces the gripping story of two of these men - Edward Whalley and William Goffe - and their lives in America, from their welcome in New England until their deaths there. With fascinating insights into the governance of the American colonies in the seventeenth century, and how a network of colonists protected the regicides, Matthew Jenkinson overturns the enduring theory that Charles II unrelentingly sought revenge for the murder of his father. 'Charles I's Killers in America' also illuminates the regicides' afterlives, with conclusions that have far-reaching implications for our understanding of Anglo-American political and cultural relations. Novels, histories, poems, plays, paintings, and illustrations featuring the fugitives were created against the backdrop of America's revolutionary strides towards independence and its forging of a distinctive national identity. The history of the 'king-killers' was distorted and embellished as they were presented as folk heroes and early champions of liberty, protected by proto-revolutionaries fighting against English tyranny. Jenkinson rewrites this once-ubiquitous and misleading historical orthodoxy, to reveal a far more subtle and compelling picture of the regicides on the run.

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Foundation: the history of England from its earliest beginnings to the Tudors

By Ackroyd, Peter

Publishing Date: 2012

Classification: 900

Call Number: 942 ACK

Peter Ackroyd, whose work has always been underpinned by a profound interest in and understanding of England's history, now tells the epic story of England itself. In Foundation, the chronicler of London and of its river, the Thames, takes us from the primeval forests of England's prehistory to the death, in 1509, of the first Tudor king, Henry VII. He guides us from the building of Stonehenge to the founding of the two great glories of medieval England: common law and the cathedrals. He shows us glimpses of the country's most distant past--a Neolithic stirrup found in a grave, a Roman fort, a Saxon tomb, a medieval manor house--and describes in rich prose the successive waves of invaders who made England English, despite being themselves Roman, Viking, Saxon, or Norman French. With his extraordinary skill for evoking time and place and his acute eye for the telling detail, Ackroyd recounts the story of warring kings, of civil strife, and foreign wars. But he also gives us a vivid sense of how England's early people lived: the homes they built, the clothes the wore, the food they ate, even the jokes they told. All are brought vividly to life in this history of England through the narrative mastery of one of Britain's finest writers. - (McMillan Palgrave)

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Tudors: a history of England

By Ackroyd, Peter

Publishing Date: 2012

Classification: 900

Call Number: 942.05 ACK

Rich in detail and atmosphere and told in vivid prose, 'Tudors' recounts the transformation of England from a settled Catholic country to a Protestant superpower. It is the story of Henry VIII's cataclysmic break with Rome, and his relentless pursuit of both the perfect wife and the perfect heir.

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A history of Wales

By Davies, John

Publishing Date: 2007

Classification: 900

Call Number: 942.9 DAV

Stretching from the Ice Ages to the present day, this account traces the political, social and cultural history of the land that has come to be called Wales.

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Paris under water: how the city of light survived the great flood of 1910

By Jackson, Jeffrey H

Publishing Date: 2011

Classification: 900

Call Number: 944.3608 JAC

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